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Canada Bear #’s 1 & 2 [Review]


Canada Bear #’s 1 & 2

S & P Comics
Creator and Penciller: Paul Farris
Writer and Letterer: Sean Wilson
Inker: Carlos Azevedo
Reviewer: Rob Wrecks


After reading this, I am so, so, SO glad I saw ComixCentral on Twitter promoting this comic.

I’m even gladder I reached out about potentially reviewing it as well cause this was highly enjoyable for me. To the point it had me laughing over the goofy silliness that’s contained within the pages of these two comics. And any team that can get you laughing more than once over their comic’s events is a team that deserves an award in my humble view. I’m curious if Paul Harris and Sean Wilson have any Canadian roots or if this is just something they chose to do for the heck of it. Or perhaps out of a love for Canadian culture and admittedly, I found more amusement then I should have in the use of the word ‘Eh’ that are found throughout these first two issues. Now Canada Bear is something I probably coulda passed on to Derrick considering his love for stuff involving animals that talk and the like, but then that would have meant I wouldn’t have found so much joy within Canada Bear’s pages. Who is a legit bear who ended up changed thanks to the Canadian Government.

Even if it wasn’t something they were intending on during their (to me anyway) oddball war with the Swiss! Our furry hero can talk, fly, be super strong, and is invulnerable. Kinda like Superman but, you know, furrier and a bear! Canada Bear would be perfect as a cartoon for kids, teenagers, and adults to enjoy together as it’s not something that’s meant to be taken seriously. No, its just meant to be taken as something to enjoy. Or at least that’s how I view what Paul and Sean are doing here. The art and the coloring definitely help sell the idea of this being something for all ages to enjoy. I’m curious just how aware the Canadian Government is of what happened with our furry hero and just what exactly was in that bomb of theirs to change him like it did! Fairly certain though they now know to thoroughly check the land below them for any flight paths they take! Whoever Blue Jaw is talking too at the end of issue one is something I hope we don’t have to wait too long to find out about. Though it’s bound to be amusing either way when the mystery person and Canada Bear tie into it.

Unless of course, Paul and Sean choose to make the whole thing quite seriously. And in issue two, we get to see our furry hero take on a trio of bank robbers. Whom you wouldn’t think would be able to accomplish much considering what two of them are wearing for masks! It’s amusing however with what the leader thinks of Canada Bear, amusing but also an understandable thing given his line of thinking where the big furball is concerned! I’m not necessarily sure you would see this kind of silliness in a Marvel or DC book these days, especially the lengths we would be the leader of bank robberies goes too in order to get what he thinks is a mask from a certain furball. I would love to go on and on about this title from S & P comics, but that would ultimately spoil things for you readers and that’s the last thing I want to do. As this is something that should be enjoyed by many as much as possible due to the highly amusing fun things that go on in these first two issues. Which makes me curious as to how Paul and Sean are gonna top it with the third issue!

Will the ‘Salmon’ prevail where others have tried and failed? I have no idea but I can’t wait to find out!

You can buy Canada Bear issues in the SP ComicShop right here.


Known as Rob Wrecks, and due to a love for Independent titles that was born from an earlier start of reviewing comics for InvestComics. IndieComiX came into life from that love in 2012 and has been a-rockin’ ever since! Can reach him here and read more of his reviews and more on indiecomix.net


 




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Episode #35 | Jumping from Comics to Animation with Roy Burdine

Do you have what it takes to tackle comics and animation?

Do you have the skills to handle digital and print thousands and thousands of times over? Can you love what you do, even when it means leaving work just long enough to shower? Did you love 90’s and 2000’s hero cartoons? Then you’ve got to listen to the all-around-awesomeness of the 20-year comic/animation veteran Roy Burdine.

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Roy Burdine

Roy is different from a lot of guests we’ve had before. Many comic peeps I’ve interviewed previously fell into the passion as a teenager or even later. Not Roy. He knew he wanted to be a comic artist from the beginning and never looked back. For Roy Burdine, it’s always been about constantly moving forward and adapting while staying in love with your craft no matter where the industry takes you. Trust me, he would know. He had the courage to send in his own character creation as a child and get rejected by Stan Lee himself… sort of. Either way, rejection never kept him away from the desire to live his cartoon joy full-out. This drive eventually landed him a spot working on the beloved X-men animated series in the 90’s and the rest is history.

TMNT – Roy Burdine

Roy Burdine has been through the ringer. Animation is all about deadlines and staying in the room until you get it right. Over the years, styles, settings and job titles may change but the passion never falls by the wayside. That’s the kind of steadfast love it takes to spend so much time on a project that night and day no longer exists. In this episode, we learn about the true meaning of dedication and the evolution of the artistic process. We learn what comic artists and writers can learn from animators and visa versa. Talking with Roy puts you right in the animation studio. You can feel all the hustle and excitement that comes with the job with every recorded word. His love of art is only surpassed by his admiration of story as we learn about his transitions throughout the industry. We talk about the importance of storyboarding. We talk about the value of going digital. We talk about the dangers of staying inside a box of “purity” versus the value of being multidimensional. We talk about “finding the frame” that matters the most in comics versus drawing thousands of frames for animation. Most importantly, we talk about what the internet has done for the lone creator. Indie is the new jump to lightspeed for a career at Sony, Image, or Dreamworks if you’ve got the care, wherewithal and artistic heart necessary for the journey ahead. Bottom line: Big two or no big 2- people care about indie and they are looking for you.  

AfterMen – Roy Burdine

Don’t forget to check out the links below for information on Roy Burdine  

Webcomic: www.aftermencomic.com

Webcomic Twitter: @aftermen_comic

Instagram: Royburdine

Roy Burdine IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2424570/

Twitter: @Royburdine

Facebook: Royburdineauthor





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Episode #31 | Crushing the Comic-con with Shaun Keenan Paulet

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Wanna know how to handle any con the nerd nation throws at you? Wanna know how to raise a family and still make money doing comics?

Wanna know how to separate yourself from the pack when you’re at a table surrounded by hundreds, or even thousands of storytellers? Wanna learn how to juggle the art and business of collaboration? Look no further than this podcast and the sage advice of Australia’s number one indie comic universe maker Mr. Shaun Keenan.

Shaun-Paulet-ComixCentral
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Shaun used to go to between 20 and 30 cons or more per year as a result of his vastly successful Xtreme Champion Tournament universe and of course his very successful memorabilia platform, Comics2Movies. He’s dropped back to around 20 per year because he’s got the courage and skill set to juggle his passion for nerd culture with fatherhood. Heed this man’s ear if you want to learn how to live several successful lives at once. It’s not easy, but it is worth it, and there are lots of valuable lessons to be had along the way.
Shaun and I talk about what made his book special compared to other indie comics in a similar market and how you can work a con to your advantage by being genuine. We also learn how to set up a con table properly, how to make everything visible to your audience, and how to have a conversation and a “pitch” at the same time.XCT_comixcentral XCT-comixcentral 1
No man is an island in the world of indie comics, and Shaun has somehow managed to bring together 6 talented people who are all passionate about the Xtreme Champion Tournament universe over the last several years and beyond. He talks about how to have fun and treat comics like a business in the same blink, as well some emotional and memorable moments that can only be experienced at cons if you’ve put yourself out there for the sake of your audience.
Since Valentine’s Day is coming up, we couldn’t get through the episode without talking about the incredible support that only a significant other can provide and, of course, the importance of family. He’s our first interviewer all the way from Australia and we certainly hope he isn’t the last. We’re excited to have XCT shared on the website, and he even clued me in on some top secret opportunities that just may pop up in the near future. We’ve been promised a first glance, but I don’t want to give it all away. Taking your con experience to the next level is one thing, but hidden beneath the sage advice is that moment all indie comic creators are looking for. That moment when comics go from being a story on a page to an interactive personal experience.
Xtreme Champion Tournament: http://www.xct.com.au
Comics2Movies: www.comics2movies.com.au
Twitter XCT: @XCTComic
Twitter C2M: @Comics_2_Movies

 






 

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2017 Comics Of The Year Awards

blog-headers_2017-comics-of-the-year-awards-comixcentral

 

The First Annual Comics of the Year Awards – 2017 Edition

2017 was an astounding year of firsts here at ComixCentral. When we opened the doors in March of 2017, we could have never imagined that so many incredible Comics of exceptional quality would be added to our marketplace in such a short time. We are overwhelmed with gratitude that the community we love so much has embraced us and chosen to sell their work on ComixCentral. We thank you all for joining us on this amazing journey, and we look forward to growing together for many years to come.

With that said, this year’s nominations were excruciating to choose. We love each and every comic on our site, and the competition was fierce! We’d like to thank all of you talented creators, and I hope you know how hard it was for our team to vote this year. But, as my 10th-grade gym coach once told me, “A little competition is good for the soul!” and we’ll add, great for our industry!

 We can’t wait to see what you have in store for 2018! And with that… here are this year’s winners!


“Best Fantasy” 

Comic”Skylin 001: Old Remnants

Long ago, the six nations fell victim to the ruthless tyranny of the Demon King and his Serpen. He burned all who opposed him and spared few. With little hope for liberation, nobles from each nation journeyed to an ancient floating city where they pleaded to the Spirits for help. Six warriors, one from each nation, were granted a powerful Serpen of their own, which they used to defeat the Demon King.

Buy Now »

 “Best Mystery”

The White Room of the Asylum

The White Room of the Asylum focuses on the tape-recorded memoirs of an old man named Steve who recently committed suicide. The tapes tell of the last period of his stay at the Soraberg Asylum and his discovery of what he came to call ‘The White Room.’ The White Room is an infinite space of pure white in which the residents can create anything they can think up. Over time more residents gain access to this mysterious place- Thus beginning a series of events that stretches Steve’s sanity to its limits, offers a chance at redemption, and leaves a man too broken to fix.

Buy Now »

 “Best Action”

Smart Bomb!! Level 1-2

Imagine an alternative gamingverse. One where TV games you’ve never heard of (yet, somehow, find oh-so familiar) are the norm. If only there was an awesome mix of comics and video games magazines to let you in on what’s going on? Thank Mr.Jump!’s ghost, it’s SMART BOMB!!

Buy Now »

  “Best Thriller”

Daughters of Knights – Chapter 1

Seraphine, accused of witchcraft, recalls the demon who slaughtered her companions and framed her. Daughters of knights is a medieval horror story about a disfigured girl, slaying monsters, and an uncomfortable, unconventional attraction.

Buy Now »

  “Best Superhero”

Humalien #1

In a future where humans are extinct. One was engineered in a lab to be a living biological weapon

Buy Now »

 “Best Horror

Bastard Son: Murderborn

Busted Knuckle Press presents: ‘Bastard Son: Murderborn’, a horror graphic novel. ORIGINS OF A SLASHER – 120+ PAGES OF BLOOD AND MADNESS! Created by Frank T. Allen & Marco “Sbrillo” Fontanili. Lettering by Taylor Esposito of Ghost Glyph Studios. Chapter One cover by Jacen Burrows.

Buy Now »

 “Best Sci-Fi”

Folklore Issue 1

A band of survivors travel across North America after a biological weapon turns the world’s greatest superheroes into horrifying abominations. The first issue of Folklore’s ongoing story, collected in this easy to enjoy PDF! Purchased issues help support the ongoing creation of Folklore, but you can find all our pages for free at http://folklorecomic.com/ or support Folklore directly by visiting our Patreon at patreon.com/Folklore

Buy Now »

  “Best Mature”

Dildo Boy Origins

Dildo Boy Origins is an XXX rated short comic which satirises the chauvinistic, adolescent male power fantasies of the superhero canon. Written, coloured, and lettered by Doktor Geraldo. Illustrated by Stefani Magician’s House. @DoktorGeraldo @MagiciansHouse In association with Digital Pastiche.

Buy Now »

 “Best Manga”

Samurai Shin Issue #1

Samurai Shin is highly influenced by anime such as Afro Samurai, Samurai Champloo, and Sword Of The Stranger

Buy Now »

 “Best Comedy

BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC #0 TRUE TALENT

Renegade Psychic. Professional Hairstylist. This is not your usual paranormal adventure. This is about the rise of a new kind of hero. Or, rather, the reluctant rise of a hero. Meet Bob Holbreck, a talented guy who has mad hairstyling skills. He owns and operates a nice little shop in the trendy part of town. His clientele is building with loyal customers. Bob truly knows what looks good on a customer before they do. How does he do it? How does he know what to do with a head of hair? Well, Bob has other talents. There are those who may consider it a gift. Like his great-grandfather, who is at odds about Bob’s future career choice. Bob just wants to be a hairstylist and make people feel good about themselves; Gramps wants him to cash in on his psychic abilities.

Buy Now »

  “Best LGBTQ+”

Alex Priest #1

In a world where vampires and demon ilk are very, very real, two agencies work to keep the world safe from the forces of darkness. Demon Eradication And Denial (DEAD LLC) is a corporate entity that charges itself with the training and employment of demon slayers – specialists in combating magical beings. Living Corpses that Bite (LC & B) is a tax exempt public entity that relies on time proven traditions to keep humanity safe from vampires. When hunting evil evolved into blue collar work, the evil had to evolve.

Buy Now »


 “Best Story Arc”

Project Shadow Breed #1

In the new millennia, SinTech, a private government contract corporation began developing a serum to turn ordinary soldiers into werewolves. With the backing of the US military, SinTech perfected the serum. In 2014, they created the first “wolf pack” of soldiers. What they didn’t expect to create was Marrok.

Buy Now »

 “Best Series”

WOLF HANDS: Season 1

Vaughn Miller is a mild-mannered cellphone plan salesman who was bitten by a dying werewolf. Now, whenever trouble rears its ugly head, he transforms into a werewolf….IN HIS HANDS! Pursued by the evil Professor Orchid and his army of Frankensteins, Vaughn turns to his far-more-capable girlfriend Jenny Rose to get him out of this increasingly sticky situation. Madcap adventures and cartooney ultra-violence ensue! Written by Justin Heggs with art by Nick Johnson.

Buy Now »

 “Best Overall” 

RAGS: PROLOGUE

Marine Corps Veteran Regina Ragowski is trapped naked and alone in the town of Paso Robles during the Zombie Outbreak. In order to survive she’ll need to avoid the zombies and find food, shelter and weapons…but most importantly….a clean pair of pants.

Buy Now »

Congratulations to all our first annual Comic of the Year Award Winners!

You can check out all the Nominated Comics here:

Get your Comics uploaded and available for sale on ComixCentral.com to enter the 2018 Comic of the Year Awards! 

 





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Episode #24 | J Adam Farster

comixcentral_carousel_homepage_adam-farster

On this weeks episode of “Adventures in Interviewing” Chris Hendricks interviews  J. Adam Farster

“There’s probably gonna be a robot.”

Join Chris while he finds out makes the delightfully inspiring and motivating creator of the Humalien series, J. Adam Farster tick! Adam, Indie Comic creator, graphic designer, Kickstarter, and one of the founding members of the Indie Comic think tank and collaboration group, “The Lab”, shares his own personal origin story, how he creates his comics and drops some mad wisdom for new and wanna’ be creators along the way. So turn it up, put your brain on “soak in” mode and let’s meet J. Adam Farster!

 “Don’t be afraid of failing, because the entire process is about failing.
Even when you’re succeeding, you’re probably failing somewhere”. – J Adam Farster

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Connect with Adam

Twitter  |  CXC Profile





 

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Episode #23 – Julio Guerra

comixcentral_carousel_deathbag

On this weeks episode of “Adventures in Interviewing” Chris Hendricks interviews Julio Guerra.

In the words of Julio’s profound character Deathbag, “Grumble, grumble, grunt, grumble, grunt.” We couldn’t have said it better. With all seriousness, pop your earphones on, turn up the volume on your bluetooth speaker, tell Alexa to play it loud, however you choose to listen, listen up… we’re joined today by the hilarious and inspiring Indie comic creator, Juilo Guerra. Let’s do this.

 

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Connect with Julio

Twitter  |  CXC Profile





 

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Episode #22 | Anthony Cleveland

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Comic Creator Anthony Cleveland

On this weeks episode of “Adventures in Interviewing” Chris Hendricks interviews Anthony Cleveland. The incredibly fascinating Comic writer of the comic Chris calls, the #1 Horror Comic with Heart, Silver Skin.

We’re getting personal and awesome up in the Podcast this week with Comic creator Anthony Cleveland. We chat about Anthony’s creation process and you have to tune to hear how he funded his latest comic book project, Silver Skin. It’ll make you lol!
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Connect with Anthony Cleveland 

Twitter  |   Website





 

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Joe Francis Totti | Creator Spotlight

inktober-winner-joe-tottie-2017-creator-spotlight

Welcome to our first ever “Inktober Winner Edition” of CXC Creator Spotlight.

Today we are joined by the 2017 CXC Inktober Winner, Joe Francis Totti!

During this year’s Inktober, Joe took the road less traveled and created an entire Comic over the 31 day period. Slow rolling a terrifyingly good mini-horror, delighting his Instagram followers with every gruesome panel. It’s for this reason our selection team chose Joe as our winner and we thought you’d all enjoy getting to know this talented writer, illustrator and graphic designer as much as we did.

Let’s get to the interview!


Hello Joe! First off, congratulations on winning our first ever CXC Inktober Contest! The hundreds of entries we received from incredible artists made choosing very difficult, but your work came out on top as the clear winner this year. A truly exceptional execution of Inktober, we tip our hats sir!

Now, please tell our readers a little bit about yourself and your work.

Joe: My name is Joe Francis Totti, I’m 29 years of age and based in Liverpool in the Uk, My profession is Freelance Graphic Designer, but my love, life, and passion are reserved for comics (and my wife haha). I have worked in the creative industry for the past 7 years. Only in the past few years did I puck up the courage to jump into indie comics and social media and try to find my footing in the industry. That is something I am still working on daily to find haha.

What kind of comics do you create?

Joe: So far they all seem to have a dark tone, I find myself working on Horror or Science fiction, but I like to make sure there is humour in everything I work on. It brings you out of the misery and grimness.

When did you get your start?

Joe: I like to think I’m still waiting for it haha!

What made you decide to start making comics, how did you get into it?

Joe: I have one of those personalities, I cant just enjoy something I have to be involved in the things I love, so naturally, I found myself craving the idea of making my own stories up and drawing them.


How about your graphic design career? Did you attend art school, or are you self-taught?

Joe: I studied under two amazing teachers, Alan Baker and Paul C, but even they would say University sets you deadlines and it’s your job to teach yourself.

How do the two occupations complement/ clash with each other? Do you have a favourite?

Joe: It really helps me with compositional work and understanding programs like photoshop & illustrator. So this helps with the colouring and lettering of my work and understanding the print process, but I love comics, they wipe the floor with design hahaha!

What do you see as the biggest obstacle to your success?

Joe: I like to feel like I’m yet to be successful to help me keep pushing haha (ever the pessimist haha) but I would say allowing people to work with me and not being a control freak and doing all the work myself.

What’s the one thing (tool, process, etc) that you absolutely could not live without during the creative process?

Joe: My Mac (computer not jacket) haha.

What resources do you rely on for illustration?

Joe: I love to use my little notebook and fine liners (when traditional) and my Yiynova graphics tablet when working digitally.

Who are your biggest inspirations in the comic realm?

Joe: I would have to say, Tony More, Rick Remender, Daniel Warren Johnson, James Harren, and Mike Spicer all masters of there craft!

Where do you get your inspiration and ideas from?

Joe: Usually, a situation sparks a weird idea then I jot it down and develop it from there. Conversations are really important to the process as well, tell people about your ideas it really helps.

What does your workspace look like?


Tell us a funny story JOE!

Joe: Aha! Last year at thought bubble festival I had an opportunity to meet one of my heroes in comics, Jeff Lemire, creator of one of my favourite books Sweet tooth.  We had a conversation at my table and he said come over and say hey and I’ll draw you a quick doodle of Gus.  So I head to his table I stood there like a deer in headlights and he said: “what’s your name again so I can sign this?”  I said, Joe. The room was loud so he said “Jon?” (I thought) so I said, “With an N?” And he said “Joe with an N?” I said “I’m not sure” ….. he then said “do you know how to spell your name?” haha so I went red-cheeked and slumped away from the table embarrassed, but he gave me the drawing below. He was a great guy, gave me multiple prints and books.

Where do you hope to be in 5 years creatively?

Joe: Like most creators, I have dreams of releasing a book with image comics, but I will be happy as long as I’m still making comic books.

What do you think the big publishers could learn from the Indie scene and vice versa?

Joe: I like both for different reasons, I would say they both serve a purpose as well, but there is a real sense of levity with characters in indie comics I would love to see in the big two but, would that be destroying what I love about them? Haha tricky question.

That just about wraps it up Joe, any final thoughts?

Joe: I would love to share my projects I’ve recently been involved with. They are: The Landings, being published through Markosia. It’s a sci-fi horror, super hammy like the old cinema, a bit like (it came from beneath the sea) this is with writer Elijah James. Also a project with Matt fitch and Dead Canary Comics called “Eye in the sky”. This is part of an anthology called “Adventures in science” out next week through the Dead Canary Comics website, http://www.deadcanarycomics.com/product/adventures-in-science/  Another is Self-made hero’s The Corbyn Comic. I worked on a 3-page story in this anthology called – Lethal Corbyn III – with Chris Baker also of Dead Canary Comics. I realize I’m rambling now, but look out for my social media for news on the printing of mine and Matt Fitches Inktober comic that we will be printing in the next few months! 🙂

Lethal Corbyn III
Eye in the Sky

Awesome! This has been such a pleasure Joe! How can people find out more about you and the work you do?

Joe: You can find me @thelifeoftotti on both Instagram and Twitter thank you for all the support through Inktober.


Well, that’s it for this Creator Spotlight! Thanks so much for joining us. Make sure you follow Joe on all his social platforms, you’re gonna’ want to keep an eye on this talented guy! I think we’ll see great things from Mr. Totti! Who knows, maybe one day he’ll misspell your name at Comic-con!

Instagram  twitter


 

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Episode #18 | J Francis Totti

j francis totti_podcast

On this weeks episode of “Adventures in Interviewing” Chris Hendricks interviews our 2017 CXC Inktober Contest Winner!

Inktober_comixcentral_winner.6

Join Chris and our 2017 CXCInktober Winner J Francis Totti as they delve into the comic illustrator’s creative process, work habits, the social impact and importance of “Friends” in the UK and why Joe self-identifies as a Chandler.
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Connect with J Francis Totti

Twitter   |  Instagram





 

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Champions of Hara: Chapters 1 and 2 | Comicbook Review

comixcentral_comic-review-champions-of-hara

Champions of Hara: Chapters 1 and 2

Reviewed by Rod Jenkins


Creators: Walter Barber
Ian Vannest
Andrew Zimmerman

Writer: Walter Barber

Art, Colors, Lettering: Jason Piperberg

Cover Art: Chapter 1 – Hannah Kennedy
Chapter 2 – M. Misztal


Quick hit: Champions of Hara is a mix between Fate Stay Night Anime and Eternal Champions.

Champions of Hara is a tale of a world created from chaotic energies, that is also being destroyed by those same energies. In order to keep the lifeforms of Hara viable, the Kensei (guardians of Hara) reach out to other worlds, perhaps other dimensions, to find beings who may be able to control and harness the chaotic energies of Hara and stabilize the realm, only one can claim the right to these energies, thus from what I gather, an ‘unofficial’ competition begins to see who is worthy of possessing Hara’s energy, and as a side perk, the winner gets to have the greatest desire granted.


This reviewer quickly thought. if these guardians have that kind of power, why can’t they control Hara’s energy on their own? Perhaps as the tale is told, more of Hara’s secrets will be revealed. The ‘chapters’ of Champions of Hara are quick, with timely wording and elegance provided by writer Walter Barber. These first two novellas introduce readers to the first 2 participants in the competition. It must be pointed out, that so far there has not been an actual number of participants listed, so from here, no one can be certain if there are any more beings participating.

The expertise of artist Jason Piperberg is clearly shown throughout both books, from knowledge of time settings of Earth to fantasy flora and fauna.

champions_of_hara_review_comixcentral_1

Piperberg’s use of shades and colors deftly, and subtly set the emotion and pace of Barber’s writing. I give full marks to Jason for his use of digital coloring, as this reviewer is not a huge fan of the technique, Piperberg touch is not overblown, nor lacking to the lineart, instead, it’s a perfect harmonious balance.

champions_of_hara_review_comixcentral_2

The only flaws of these fine books are: a page wasted for indicia, perhaps the creative team was looking for ways to stretch out the stories (each book is just 12-14 pages) This reader would’ve preferred if the legalese was placed along with the credits, the give Piperberg a page to really show off his artistic skill (perhaps with character design sketches).

The other flaw is the second page is too dark, where, readers skip by the pencil art that is on the page, you don’t see it because of the darkness of the page, a lighter gradient will fix this oversight.

Champions of Hara is all too quick of a ride, however, the substance that Baber and Piperberg give readers, is a complete joy, that has this reader and many more, eagerly waiting to see what is upcoming.

Rating 4 out 5 eyes ( Worth the price of Admission)





 

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Nick Johnson – Comicbook Illustrator and Creator | Episode #13

Episode #13 – Interview with Comicbook Creator and Illustrator Nick Johnson

On this weeks episode of “Adventures in Interviewing” Chris Hendricks gets behind-the-curtain access to illustration wizard Nick Johnson, the artist and co-creator of the comedy-horror series “Wolf Hands.” In a world overrun with social media creators are reminded that success lies hidden within the weeds of personal conversation and the belief that art is much more than ink on a page.

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Connect with Nick and Buy his stuff using the links below:

Twitter  |  nickj.ca  |  @nicksoup  |  The ComixShop of NICK JOHNSON




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Podcast Episode #13 – WOO! Todd Matthy Talks Robots vs Princesses

Episode #13 – Adventures in Interviewing with Todd Matthy, creator of Robots v Princesses

On this episode, Chris Hendricks gets the lowdown on how indie comic creator Todd Matthy ran a wildly successful Kickstarter Campaign. They destroyed their goal and are now bringing Robots vs Princesses to the world!
They also have a delightful, impression filled conversation about Pro Wrestling and the lessons Todd gained from being a lifelong fan. Do not miss this fantastic and often nerd-nostalgic episode!
robots vs princesses comixcentral
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Connect with Todd and find out where you can grab a copy of Robots vs Princesses below:

robotsvsprincesses.com  |   Twitter


 

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Just DO the work.

comic book motivation

A friend of mine had once told me the secret to breaking into the comics biz was to “Just DO the work.”

Without name dropping, this friend, who made quite a name for himself in the indie comics world and was becoming a success in his own right. When he gave me this seed of wisdom, it took some time for the idea to grow. Once I realized what he meant, I was at the drawing table as often as I had the time. Just creating.

I had had brushes with my dream job, make it into the comics biz as a full-time storyteller, a few times in the past. My relationships with other creators always seem to steer me further into the right direction. But somehow, fall short of the intended destination.

I pushed my submissions to many publishers over the years, nearly coming close to drawing my hero for a fledgling company. No matter how close I came to my dream, it seemed not to be. I was chasing the damned Roadrunner. It was exhausting. Coyote or not, I could not continue wasting my time and energy chasing something, seemingly, unattainable. So, what was there to do?



“Just DO the work.” His words kept pinging off the inside of my brain. What had it meant?

To me, four words never held such mysticism and mystery. Doing the work surely had meant keep submitting your work to companies. Over time, that didn’t prove true. So, there had to be another meaning. One I had to discover on my own. Just DO the work. Just create. Just write. Just draw. Just DO it. It began to sound convincing. What had I to lose?

Over the years, technology progressed, social media pages began exploding with all kinds of new apps. I began to think, Fine, If I can’t sell my art, I’ll showcase it. Somebody is bound to take notice. I took my art to Instagram and to Facebook. I stopped trying to sell myself to a faceless company whose only concerns were their bottom line and not the reader’s interest. I want to tell stories and draw them for you as I see in my head. 

Just DO the work. Let THEM decide if they like it. Get your stuff out there. Don’t be afraid of negative feedback.


 

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The Red Hyena Dragged Me Into The 21st Century!

red hyena doktor geraldo

Digital art fascinates me.

I usually work in traditional media, such as pencils, multiliners, copic markers, coloured pencils, watercolour, and gouache. I use apps on my phone to manipulate my drawings, making alpha layers and background layers, and scaling and making panels. Then I transfer to my laptop and use Photoshop to build pages and arrange the lettering. That’s as far as I venture into the digital realm.

I decided to draw a pinup of The Red Hyena, a great character from Project Shadow Breed. I started with a pencil drawing, outlined it, then blocked in the areas with flat layers using copic markers. I would normally render with markers, adding shadows and depth, then highlight areas with coloured pencil or gouache. Instead, I uploaded the drawing to Photoshop and decided to finish it digitally.

I was so absorbed in the process that I forgot to save the separate stages, but the last image in the strip was the final result!

Issues 1-4 of Project Shadow Breed are available at ComixCentral.


 


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Faithfully Human – J.M Bryan

jm bryan

 Greetings everyone. Today I’m honored to connect with the very prolific, and very honest, J. M. Bryan.

While I would normally put together some color-coded, alliteration-obsessed introduction to focus your attention, this artist is far too personal for heavy-handed words. It doesn’t take much Internet stalking to become attached to J’s style. It’s near impossible to not get pulled underneath the “criminally” emotional riptide that is Closer, and his collection of shorts, Stuff, seems to be the perfect marriage between a childish heart and an old soul. Whether you’re healed by the young vulnerability of “Broken,” or choose to breakdown reality itself with the abstract storytelling in “Galaxia Apparatus” (soaked in just the right amount of fear mind you), the journey always seems to end in quiet reflection.

Without giving away too much, Ted is my new favorite member of the undead community. J’s humorous take on humility and relationships makes being undead seem very life-like. Lastly, his colorful take on a bad dream just might leave you looking forward to your next nightmare. Take a deep breath, my friends. Let’s find out what’s it’s like inside the open heart of an artist just crazy enough to be himself.

 

Chris: Good to have you with us, J. I understand you have a comic writer in the family. Did that inspire/influence your storytelling? How long have you been writing, and what was it like shifting from poetry to short stories to novels to comics?

J: I have a cousin, Rich Woodall, who has been writing and illustrating comics for as long as I can remember. I remember being a kid looking at his comic collections and at his books thinking, “I want to make something like this someday.” So I guess it inspired in that I knew that I could do it if I put my mind to it and actually did it. My adventure in writing comics has just begun, but I’ve been writing prose and poetry since I could write. I actually have an old notebook full of “ghost stories” I wrote in first grade. They are terrible, truly terrible, but I suppose the positive side is that I was putting something down on paper. When I finally started writing comic scripts, the first few drafts were incredibly rough, but thankfully there are a lot of resources on the internet that help you learn to write in any kind of medium. So the transition really wasn’t that bad.




Chris: Kickstarter is a typical avenue for many indie comic creators, BUT I understand you managed to get it 250% funded via mostly strangers without much connection in the community or strategy. How do you explain your success?

J: Dumb luck, mostly. I was fortunate to have a lot of people share the project and, if I can take any credit (which I don’t want to), I would say that my low goal amount and low pledge levels really helped me meet my goal. I think people are a lot more likely to help any kind of crowdfunding effort when they feel like they are going to get their money’s worth or more. I tried my best to offer a lot for a little. My goal with Closer was not to make money but to make something people would want to read, so I really just wanted to get it into people’s hands.

Chris: Closer is a wonderful story. I’m curious. It’s in Black and White, and yet, Nathaniel’s love Marie has scars. The simple choice seems to pull emphasis away from the injury, but Marie is very self-conscious about them. Is that symbolic of how we as humans tend to focus on “imperfections” more than we should, or is it simply coincidence? I have many scars myself and would love your take on things.

J: I’m going to try and keep this answer as short as I can, but I could spend all day talking about this aspect of Closer because, at the core, it’s what the comic is about. I’m a believer, mostly by experience, that everyone has something that they would give up everything for. It’s that old cliché that “everyone has a price.” When I was a teenager and the story for Closer began forming in my mind, that something was love. I would have done anything to find that one person I could be with forever. Now, as a married man with kids, I think that family is that thing I would give up everything for. I would do anything to make sure they are safe and taken care of. Now those are pretty standard answers, but I wanted to explore the darker side of all this in Marie’s self-consciousness about her scars. If someone were to come along and offer to take those away, to give her the relief from the stares and the whispers of people she walked by, what would she do to get it? If there truly is something that haunts us all, something that we suffer with every day, what would we give up to have that taken away and finally be at peace? That’s really where the focus on the scars comes from.

Chris: Did you always want Closer to be a 2-Issue story? Where does your love of the short story form come from? Do you prefer a quick knockout punch to longer bouts of exploration? I understand it was initially meant to be a novel.

J: Yeah, I originally planned it to be a novel, but I found that I needed some sort of visual to go with it in order to fully tell the story that I wanted to tell faithfully. That was really frustrating to me and bothered me for a long time until I decided to put it into comic form. I fully intended to release it as a one-shot comic, but after talking with some people about it, I decided to release it in two parts to really raise the tension and have that cliff hanger that I really wanted in there. While I love a good ongoing comic, I feel it’s easier for me at this point in my writing career to write shorter stories to ensure that I can really write a full beginning, middle, and end to a story. I suppose that means that right now I write shorter stories for convenience, but I don’t want to bring myself into a situation this early on where I wouldn’t be able to finish something that I started. I must also add that some of my favorite books growing up were the collections of short stories of any genre, especially scary stories. Those have always meant a lot to me because I spent so much time getting into them.

Chris: I love to read. I tend to dive into non-fiction, though I agree with you in terms of it being dry at times. Stephen King taught me to love the more imaginative form, but why do you feel reading fiction is important for people in general?

J: I think that any kind of reading is beneficial. For instance, I noted recently to someone that while I might not enjoy a book like Twilight (just an example, no one needs to jump on me), I know that I can learn something from the writing, whether it is what to do or what not to do, when writing a book. Reading fiction allows me to explore worlds I never imagined and can really open my mind to new possibilities with my own creations. Even if you aren’t looking that deeply into the work, there are many classic works of fiction that challenge us in many ways or just entertain us. Some fall into both those categories, being both entertaining and challenging, but either way I believe they can be beneficial to anyone. Siddhartha by Herman Hesse taught me to challenge my faith. Harry Potter was a ton of fun and taught me a lot about right and wrong. We can always learn, whether it’s a biography about a president or an outer space adventure.

Chris: My love of comics has been a tremendous learning experience. I’m still trying to understand the importance of lettering. Can you tell me where your passion for it comes from, and why it’s more important than new readers might realize?

J: Someone told me that good lettering is pretty much invisible, but bad lettering can be a flashing light on the page. I think this is incredibly true. If the lettering is bad it can make a page confusing, difficult to read, or ruin what could be a great comic by making it feel like a jumbled mess. Good lettering, on the other hand, makes a comic flow in such a way that you barely even know it’s there. I think the good lettering is the reason why lettering has gone unnoticed, which is a good thing.  I have a bit of history with graphic design and typography, which led me to look into learning lettering as another form of comics to explore. I like to make things look clean, and taking a comic and trying to make it readable is exciting to me. I’m a bit of a design nerd.

Chris: I read that you believe the Internet tends to “frame” a creator’s vision. Can you tell me more about that, and why it might be something worth avoiding as a creator?

J: Absolutely. We live in this “social media era” where what’s trending seems to be monitored more than real world issues. In that world, our ideas and opinions literally change with the time of day because we are constantly looking around to see what’s popular and what people want. Unfortunately, this sometimes can cause people to limit their vision and their minds to just that scope of view. Sometimes in comic-making you have to make the stuff that no one wants to read just because you want to make it. We need to be alright with not being the popular comic. If we are constantly chasing trends, we betray the creative spirit within us all. I truly believe that. We need to make what we want to, not what the internet wants. On the positive side, though, if you hit the right side of one of those trends it can really boost careers and help spread your work. Retweets and shares can boost exposure exponentially. There are two sides to everything, I think.

Chris: You know more than anyone that the Internet also allows for collaboration. It’s one of my favorite things about creativity. Tell us about what that has been like for you, and how other people have helped bring your vision to life.

J: This has been the coolest thing for me. Because of the connectivity of social media and sites like Reddit, I’ve been able to work with people from all over the globe. Only in 2017 can a guy from the US work with a Serbian artists and a British letterist. Only in 2017 can I talk to people from 4 different time zones on 4 different continents. We may take this for granted a lot, but I had to take a step back in awe at the fact that this was the reason my comic could be made. While I have met and made friends with an artist from the area in which I live, when I started making comics my “creative circle” was more of a dot, me. Closer came to be because I put out ads on social media and met the right people.

Chris: Stuff was a really interesting collection of shorts. It’s very clear that you have a mind of exploration and vulnerability. I think everyone has their own answer to this, but why is it important to make storytelling so personal?

J: To be honest, I don’t think a comic is worth reading if it’s not personal in some way to the creator. The reason I think that is because I feel like we are more invested in the things we create if there’s a piece of us in it, not just something we did for kicks with no thought. What makes any comic unique is that it is written/illustrated/colored/lettered by different people with varying experiences and feelings. If they put those into their work, readers get a very personal, yet different story. It makes our books special. It makes them part of us and that’s something to cherish and be proud of.

Chris: It’s clear to me that faith and family are very important to you. Since you’ve had the courage to be so personal with your audience in your storytelling, may I be so bold as to ask about your own love story? How did you meet your other half, and how has family been an asset to your own creativity?

J: My wife really saved my life. I met her at a time in my life where I was pretty sure I was going to die alone and didn’t really know what my purpose was. We met when one of my exes told me about this site she met her husband on, Christian Mingle (yes, the one with the terrible commercials). I didn’t really know what to expect, but, to make a long story short, I ended up meeting my wife. It turned out that she went to highschool with one of my best friends and knew a lot of the same people that I did. I think that’s what made her decide to actually meet me. Since then, our life together has been a whirlwind. We dated for just over 2 years before we got married, and we now have two beautiful baby girls. They really are my whole world, and it absolutely frames my writing. As I watch my girls grow, I’m leaning toward more all-ages comics because I want to make things that they can enjoy. At the same time, though, I now understand the heroes in the books that sacrifice it all to save someone because that’s what I would do for them. They have made me a better writer, and I’m even more determined to succeed in what I do because I want them to be proud of me.

Chris: Thank you J. It’s been a joy to learn from you.


As much as I value words on a page as conduits for learning, my true love for individual creativity comes from those moments that transcend skill, methodology, or practice– something that can’t be read in a book or absorbed from a computer screen.

The truth is, we do not find creativity. Creativity finds us when we are ready. J. M. Bryan is more than ready. His love story alone is proof that honesty and art can come together to form an endearing and trustworthy spirit I can only describe as family. His pages feel like one-on-one conversations. His body of work feels like bandages anyone would love to wear. He’s the new medicine man of the indie comic world with plenty of scar tissue to go around. Don’t worry. There’s nothing to hide. With someone like J. M. Bryant around, you might just give those battle lines you’ve drawn over the years a much closer look.

To learn more about what J.M is up to, buy his work or just connect, check out the links below:

jmbryanwrites.myportfolio.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jmbryanwrites/

CXC: @jmbwrites

ComixShop: Little Monster Comics





 

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Crowdfunding Monthly Roundup – May 2017

comic book crowdfunding may

Hoooooweee, have we got some incredible Crowdfunding Campaigns to share!

Guys, we scoured Kickstarter this month to find you some amazing options on which to spend your dollars, make some dreams come true and be entertained AF! We’ve got some real gems in this May edition, so sit back, get that scrolling finger warmed up and let’s get started… KICKSTARTED that is!

And with that amazing play on words, may we present, the CXC Crowdfunding Monthly Roundup, May 2017.


KICKSTARTER

Emily Green is a struggling politician. She is the second-in-command of the British government, but her personal life is falling apart, she doesn’t believe in the political system anymore and she is preparing to quietly step down from her position after the upcoming General Election.

Jump into the Queen universe that Graphic Policy’s Brett Schenker, who works in politics, describes as

“About as authentic as you can get.”

After reading about the personal struggle that led creator Jamie Me to create Queen, we knew this was an important series and wanted to do our best to get the word out so he can continue to bring these incredible stories to life.

We think you should check out this campaign and throw your support behind this extraordinary team as well. Whether that means backing or sharing, let’s help these guys reach the widest audience possible, and help Queen find it’s home among every indie fan’s collection. 

Kickstarter Campaign   |    Twitter    |    Facebook


KICKSTARTER

Seemingly unrelated Horror and Sci-Fi stories in one gnarly 66 page comic book. Gross, gore, guest artists, grind-house style goodness!

http://kck.st/2p2Y5vc

What the Hell is KURU Anyway?

This phenomenal team would like their associated, Rod, to clue you lovely folks in about what exactly this sexy new book is all about!

Kuru is a horror comic book series that creator Brian Flint has been working on for the past year. The stories lean towards a Monster Movie/Science Fiction vibe with elements of Body Horror and a few Occult themes. His goal was to create a comic with crazy visuals, scary supernatural creatures and that grisly gory good stuff we all love to see in our favorite horror media. Couple that with unique, funny, likable characters and BLAZAM! You’ve got HELLBO-(ahem!)-you’ve got KURU!

This campaign has left us a little more than speechless. From the artwork to the professionally produced trailer to gripping storylines, Kuru #1 is more than a horror comic… it’s an experience. And in our humble opinion, it’s an experience everyone should partake in.

Drink heartily from the well of creativity being offered here my indie brethren, you are sure to have your thirst quenched! 

Kickstarter Campaign   |    Website    |    Facebook


KICKSTARTER

Issue one and issue two packages available – “What you see, what you can see, what you think you know; it tilts.”

http://kck.st/2qFJEBW

Show this campaign some love in its final days and get yourself some of these insanely creative comics and sweet swag too!

Kickstarter Campaign   |   Twitter    |   Website


KICKSTARTER

Derik Diaz is funding a print run for the over-sized second volume of his retro 90s action-adventure comic, The Adventures of Toad!

http://kck.st/2ppAd56

YES!! Get in on this guys! To quote the trailer, “Let’s destroy this goal with a webfooted kick to the face!”

Kickstarter Campaign   |   Website


KICKSTARTER

MONSTERS! LOST WORLDS! UFOs! The strange and unknown! Karl Kesel and Tom Grummett finally finish the comic they began 17 years ago!

http://kck.st/2qzV0UG

These dudes have a lofty goal, but totally doable with a book and team like this! Let’s make this happen! Also.. guys, these books take me back to 90’s X-Men.. and my nostalgic tears are flowing. 

Kickstarter Campaign   |   Facebook


And that’s it for now! If you’ve got a Campaign you think belongs on our list, let us know!

@comixcentral


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J Adam Farster: The New Blue Bomber

j adam farster

What’s up, super seekers? It’s time for another life dive dance, and I’m happy to cut in.

For today’s episode, I get to slice through the mental majesty of J Adam Farster and his 4 piece 80’s arc explosion, Humalien. It’s wild whack-attack, GotG meets Family Ties vibes sound like the Happy Days, all-ages, oddball orchestra everyone hears coming from the pit of their soul. It’s accidental humor meets an electric slide surprise. By the way, he does all the illustration and storytelling himself. Enough jib-jab. Let’s explode onto the scene.

J. Adam Farster / Humalien

Chris: Hey Adam. Thanks for joining us. First off, where do you fit into Humalien? Why was it so important for you to tell THIS story?

Adam: Well, in the 1900’s (’99) I had the idea and self-published a book called Y4K.  It is essentially the same as Humalien, just not as polished.  I hit some cons and showed my work around with overwhelming rejection.  I had a lot of negativity at cons, too.  It was extremely defeating.  In reality the work wasn’t great.  So I backed away and was working as a graphic artist.  I drew little comics here and there.  There were a lot of starts and stops, all the while still loving the story I had created in Y4K.  

It was almost 3 years ago talking with a friend, and then with my wife, and them both telling me to “just make the thing.”  So I re-branded, put together a Kickstarter, and made the thing.  

It was nice to make it through the project and have some extremely positive responses to the book.  It had to be time, and what I put into it, this time it feels different to be making comics.  I think it was important to complete the first 4-issue arc. There were ups and downs along the way, but ultimately having a completed project was rewarding.



Chris: Did you always intend on being the illlustrator and the storyteller? In my experience, collaboration makes it easier to market because you have more than one person pushing the content. What was it like being the lone genius? 

Adam: I like being a storyteller.  I like illustrating, but writing and coming up with ideas and figuring it all out is part of the fun.  I also have control issues; I like to be the one making the creative decisions.   Making an independent book is also a lifestyle.  You get back what you put in.  I can’t blame anyone for my failures/successes.  It all falls on me.  Not to say I don’t and won’t collaborate in the near future (foreshadowing). It just wasn’t my goal starting out.  

J. Adam Farster

Chris: Speaking of that, I read that one your most challenging things was building a brand. What was your process like? Do you have any specific MUSTS for fellow creators out there? Did Midday Monster sketches come out of that process? 

Adam: It was really just finding an audience, which I’m still looking for.  Exposure is tough in a crowded market.  I’m really just figuring it out as I go.  

As far as a MUST, I think creators need to be ok with failure. You are going to do it a ton.  Working out of that and learning is a big part of being a creator. Also, find a group of creator friends.  Start a group. Go to local drink & draw events.  Having people to bounce ideas off of is a great resource.  Plus it makes you become more social.  Sometimes you can create with them.  The group I am part of released an anthology book earlier this year called Lush.  

Midday Monsters was a plan I had that hasn’t really happened…YET.  I would like to do more live streaming and teaching/tutorials.  I just need to make time. 

My process is this:  have an idea, write a rough outline, then sketch, thumbnail, and get to work.  I have an idea and try and hit all the beats I want.  I work 100% digital with Sketchbook and Photoshop using a Cintiq, so it all goes fairly smoothly. 

J. Adam Farster

I’m working on a couple ideas right now, and I draw a lot in a sketchbook to understand the feels of characters before I can commit 100% to doing an entire book with them.  It needs to feel organic.

Chris: I checked your review on Roast.com. That must have felt pretty good. How do you handle criticism of your work? What was the most constructive advice you’ve been given as a creator? 

Adam: There have been some kind things said about Humalien and a few pretty terrible things.  When someone GETS the book, they get it and it makes me happy for days.  Some people are turned off by the art or the limitations of the story.  I’m just trying to make something fun. Everything doesn’t have to be for everyone.  I make stuff I would like to have read or would like to read and see.  You don’t see me doing a lot of superhero art because everyone does it.  How many versions of Deadpool or Batman are there out there?  They are great characters and have amazing talents working on the books.  It just isn’t what I set out to make.

The most constructive advice I’ve ever gotten was to keep making comics.  You don’t need a major publisher or anything. Anyone can make comics.

I tell this same thing to people when they ask how to get into it.  Just make your thing, put it out there.  Rinse.  Repeat. 

Chris: As far as the Humalien heroes: Ed and Plato seem brave and reckless, whereas Kuhl and Kyrja look before they leap. Which pair is more like your life style? 

Adam: I’m totally Kuhl.  He is the one who has to overthink and be the one hiding rather than right in the mix.  Ultimately I’m Ed though, even though he is all action, he is an outsider with a bunch of weirdos around him.  However, I’m sure I am the weirdo surrounded by normal people.

Chris: Speaking of reckless. I love the humorous dynamic between the characters. The dialogue seems natural. Was it easier to write the dialogue than the big picture details of the story, or was it the other way around? 

Adam: I write all the dialogue last.  I have all the art done and go in and make it flow the way I feel that is natural. Dialogue is tough to get the beats, and most of the humor is accidental.   

As long as the art hits all the story beats, then it seems to work. I have completely scrapped pages because they didn’t work sometimes 2 days before printing.

Chris:  I definitely see the 80’s vibe in the comic. You’re also clearly a Star Wars fan (Me too– WHO ISN’T?!). I also read that you were much more influenced by film and cartoons than comics themselves, at least initially. Is that true, and how has that impacted your animation style? 

Adam: I still am.  I think that film and animation are great.  There are some great comics that inspired me to take a shot.  Ultimately, it’s 80’s action/toy cartoons and movies that made me want to be a storyteller.  

Chris: I saw a sketch of Jason in your collection. I loved it. Do you have an appreciation for the hack-and-slash horror genre, and has that impacted your story telling in any way? 

Adam: I have a huge affinity for the Halloween, the first few Friday the 13th’s, and Nightmare on Elm Street movies.  I don’t think it has impacted me at all other than I love creating monsters and menacing villains.

J. Adam Farster
J. Adam Farster

Chris: Where did the idea of spontaneous combustion come from as a superpower? That’s really unique to me. Is that where the Chuck Jones/Looney Tunes influence comes into play? 

Adam: I read something about spontaneous combustion in high school, and it always fascinated me.  I thought about it a lot.  I thought of it like an electrical fire, and how cool it would be to harness the electrical power from your body and be part alien. 

Chris: I saw you went to animation school. What did you love about it? What was challenging about it? Was there a lot of critique involved (like a typical art school), or did you experience a lot of freedom? 

Adam: I did.  I went to Columbia College in Chicago.  It was great. I wanted to be Chuck Jones or Bob Clampett.  I really loved Ren & Stimpy and what John K was doing, too. While we had projects to do, we were allowed to do what we wanted with them. Critique was more on technical skills, rather, so you had a lot of room to experiment creatively.   I still love 2D and stop motion animation more than a lot of what we have going on right now.  

Chris: What’s the most exciting thing happening in your life right now outside of comics/creativity? 

Adam: I have a 3-year-old daughter, and she is the most exciting thing ever.  Everything is new, and seeing something through her eyes is so much fun.  

Adam really embodies everything representative of the indie spirit.

His grace while walking the tightrope of encouragement and criticism has provided space for a master class in independent artistry. His storytelling abilities have been crafted into a reliable catharsis of sorts. I’m excited for the next arc. If you want charming lessons in sibling rivalry, action and loyalty than look no further than Humalien. If you need a wise friend to help you navigate the oddities of life, look no further than Adam himself. He may not be a blue robot from the future, but I’d hop on the Ed express if I were you. There’s something truly “mega” in store for the man who’s just alien enough to sketch a new shade of the human experience.

J. Adam Farster

To learn more about what Adam is up to, buy his work or just connect, check out the links below:

AdamFarster.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/adamfarster

CXC: @farster13

ComixShop: Floor 13 Studios 





 

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LEGROS, A MAN OF MYSTERY

legros bob

BOB’s creator Lance was so excited about the upcoming launch, he couldn’t wait until the book was out to start cosplaying as one of its characters.  Come on, what else would you do if you created your own comic book character?!

Sure, it may have creeped out his neighbors, but his enthusiasm has given us some great visual aids with which to introduce you to Legros de Rumigny (pronounced Luh-gro, ‘cuz French).  He’s a major player in BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC #1 – though we suppose you might’ve guessed that, since his name is in the title of the of the book.

So who is Monsieur de Rumigny?  A legit historical figure, actually – a former chef who turned into the hairdresser extraordinaire of the 18th-century French court, when fashion was at its peak!  Ol’ Legros primped and preened the coiffures of the likes of Madame de Pompadour, and he’s the author of the famed L’ART DE LA COËFFURES DES DAMES FRANÇOISES, one of the earliest guides dedicated solely to his craft.

He opened and operated the prestigious ACADÉMIE POUR LA COËFFURES DES DAMES, where he taught illustrious hair constructs and helped establish hairdressing as a profession.

Go ahead and scroll through THE WORLD page on the BOB site  http://www.warehouse9pro.com/bobworld.html or Google him!

But remember, what you research won’t be the whole story!  You will have to dive into the pages of BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC #1 “The Legend of Legros” in order to find out all of the amazing secrets of the man behind the hair!





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8 Reasons To Read  the Bob: Non-Union Psychic series

bob non union psychic

In this saturated market, it’s easy to miss the little gems out there.

One diamond you probably haven’t noticed in a vast sea of rough is BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC (“Renegade Psychic. Professional Hairstylist.”), a digital-first series published by Colorado-based newcomer Warehouse 9 Productions, Ltd. in 2015.

The ad copy puts the hilarious, high-as-they-come concept as well as anyone could: “Bob Holbreck would rather use his mad hairstyling skills to make the world look a little sexier than use his awesome psychic powers to make it a lot safer.  Too bad his great Gramps won’t take no for an answer…”

Here are eight (illustrated!) reasons why BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC is worth your time.

1. BOB’s part of that too-rare gem of a genre, the paranormal-comedy-horror comic CHEW just ended, and there’s only one GHOSTBUSTERS.  BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC is serving an under-represented audience right now.  If you’re a member of it and didn’t know about BOB, well, now ya know.

2. Everyone who reads it seems to really like it.  Indie comics don’t make much of a splash – but you can tell a lot from the ripples they do make.  And the series has received unanimously high reviews, averaging no less than 4 stars out of 5.

3. BOB isn’t just an independent comic – it’s a book about independence.  Bob Holbreck’s attempt to join the Psychic Union in BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC # 0 is a story his creator Lance Lucero originally thought up as commentary on his fights with the gatekeepers of the entertainment world, but any person whose clear ability has been denied for paper-related reasons will dig the central theme of this book.

4. It’s an indie book, but everything about it is pro.  Yeah, we all like the idea of supporting the little guys in comics, but not to the extent that we’re ready to spend our hard-earned cash on sub-par work.  The production values of BOB are as good as any you’ll find, though, thanks to artist extraordinario Francisco Resendiz and the designer’s eye of Lance Lucero.

5. For a book about a psychic hairstylist, BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC is bizarrely well-researched.  Lance Lucero lives in fear of a reader informing him that this or that part of his book makes use of an incorrect fact, so the man does his homework.  For the just-released BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC # 1, his writing partner Adam Volle even stopped off in Paris to conduct some primary research.

6. BOB is bilingual!  In BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC # 1, Bob finds himself tasked with an important mission by a French ghost.  The problem is, Bob doesn’t speak French.  You don’t need to speak it either in order to follow the story, but if you do, there’s a whole extra layer of fun available.

7. BOB offers new cosplaying options. Just imagine: while all your friends are boring the world with their run-of-the-mill Deadpool costumes, you can be showing off as the 18th-century founding father of hairdressing, Legros de Rumigny!

8. BOB is timely.  Let us level with you on this: when you’re writing a book about a psychic barber, you are always on the hunt for fun and/or relevant hair-related material.  And the ‘do of a certain new president?  It’s like a gift.  It may also be a clue in a case Bob is trying to solve in BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC # 1…

You can buy the digital editions of BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC # 0 and # 1 on ComixCentral right now – and it’s highly recommended you do!


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LANCE LUCERO

lance lucero

This week we had the distinct honor of landing an interview with a true self-made Indie Comic Entrepreneur, Lance Lucero — owner and founder of Warehouse 9 Productions Ltd.

Lance’s company publishes one of the most original comics we at ComixCentral have ever had the pleasure of reading, BOB: Non-Union Psychic. Not only is the illustration work of Francisco Resendiz a stunning feast for the eyes, Lucero and Volle’s writing keeps you turning the pages, giggling, eyebrow lifting and wanting more of that less than ordinary spunky hair stylist, BOB.



So without further adieu. Here is our interview with Lance Lucero- Non-Union Comicbook creator extraordinaire! Get out your pencils creators-in-the-making, he’s got some great advice you’re not gonna’ want to miss!

Hi Lance! Could you tell our readers a little bit about your company? When did you get your start?

Lance: The late 90’s.  Warehouse 9 Productions, Ltd. was launched for the production of my independent feature film debut HUNTING FOR FISH (in the re-mastering process at present).  https://vimeo.com/user2463860 .   Originally, I considered myself a filmmaker, first and foremost, but then realized that it is important to keep producing projects in many different forms of media.

In 2015 I expanded the company into publishing, testing out the waters with the indie digital comic book BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC.  I was a hit!  So the series continues!

What made you decide to start creating Comics?

Lance:I had worked with Adam Volle (co-writer, editor BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC) on a screenplay many years ago.  He’s a talented writer and a really big comic book fan.  At the time Adam was about to get a segment that he had written and produced titled THE KLANSMEN IS DEAD published in a SHOOTING STAR Comics Anthology.  That was really exciting to see!  Adam is the real deal, so I knew he would be the person to work with if I ever wanted to dip my toe into the comic book industry.

In 2014, I thought the time was right, so I tapped Adam on the shoulder and pitched BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC to him.  The rest is history.

What kind of comics does your company publish?

Lance: Warehouse 9 Productions publishes commercial without being typical, independent, underground, quality renegade stories.  If a comic book fan is tired of the same-old-same-old, look to Warehouse 9 Productions and check out the BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC series!  We will entertain.

Could you tell us a little about the team behind BOB:NON-UNION PSYCHIC?

Lance: Lance Lucero – writer, producer, director, editor, graphics designer, and comic book creator.  /  Adam Volle – writer and editor extraordinaire!  A scholar, a teacher, a world traveler. / Francisco Resendiz – brilliant illustrator and colorist.  Destine to be a star! / Cottrel Burks – Master web designer and graphics artist.  Without Cottrel we would have no place to call home on the Internet. http://warehouse9pro.com/

What about Warehouse 9 stands out? What makes you guys unique?

Lance: What’s interesting about the comic book team at Warehouse 9 is the age difference, the cultural diversity, and living location.   We reside in the United States and abroad.  Of course, this is nothing new because of the digital age, but it’s reassuring to know that despite all the differences, there is a love and passion for storytelling and art.  It’s the glue of the team and is helps create fun and exciting entertainment.

Everyone has moments that they’d like to throw in the towel, how do you get and then keep momentum on your projects during those times?

Lance: “Throwing in the towel” is not an option.  That would be too easy to do in the independent realm.

They key is NOT to wait to be accepted by the gatekeepers.  It’s the BOB mantra – “Bob Holbreck is not just a character in a comic book – he’s a STATEMENT.  Why let the gatekeepers dictate who gets in?”

We live in a special time where a person can create a product and throw it out into the world without the backing of a major entity.  Oh, sure it would be nice to have some major company knock on the door and offer a deal of some kind, but one has to be realistic and understand that’s probably not likely.  Paying your dues is taking a risk on yourself; creating a quality work; standing on a table and yelling, “Look at me!”

It’s a long-term investment and rewards do not come initially in the way of a big payday, but rather in the way of a budding fan base and positive reviews.

In order for me to keep the momentum alive, it’s all about keeping the team together and creating awesome stories and promoting them any way you can.

Is there any advice you wish someone had given you when you were first starting out in the Comicbook industry?

Lance: I have always been a self-starter.  I wish someone gave me advice, but I have just had to do my research and trust my gut.

What do you think the “big publishers” like Marvel and DC could learn from the Indie scene and vice versa?

Lance: That’s a tough question…  I don’t believe Marvel and DC want to learn anything new, especially from the indie scene.  They (Marvel and DC) are all about “re-inventing” the same materials that have existed for decades.  I don’t think the big two are interested in new content.  Plus – Marvel is owned by Disney and DC is owned by Warner Bros., which means they have nothing to worry about; they will continue to milk their titles to the end of time in all forms of media.

What have I learned from the big two…?  Don’t get me wrong, I’m a long time fan and that’s the problem.  I think it’s okay to be different.  I want to create something that does not fit into the usual “standard. Independence is tough, but it’s also very liberating.

Do you cosplay?

Lance: I don’t cosplay, but Halloween is my favorite holiday.  Which means special attention is paid to creating awesome costumes for parties and special events.  Have a look at the amazing seamstress work of my significant other, Lori.

Reed Richards and Susan Storm of the FANTASTIC FOUR.  Constructed out of athletic fabric, not spandex.  We worked out for nine months before we stepped into these form fitting super hero outfits. Hey, if you want to be a super hero, you better get in shape like one!

 

Something more sinister, Alex and Georgie, from A CLOCK WORK ORANGE.  Yeah, we made real codpieces…

 

And our crowning achievement to date, the famous 18th Century hairdresser Legros de Rumigny and doomed Austrian queen of France Marie Antoinette.  Legros is featured in BOB: NON-UNION PSYCHIC #1 “The Legend of Legros.”  There’s nothing cooler than dressing up as one of the characters from your own book!

Those are amazing, you guys are a creative powerhouse! Back to the questions: What is your ultimate goal in comics? What does the future hold for Warehouse 9?

Lance: The ultimate goal is to create more entertaining content and branch out to other forms of media.  Hey, might as well think big, right?

Knowing what you know about the publishing industry and self publishing, what advice would you give an up-and-coming creator looking to get their comic into the hands of readers?

Lance: Incorporate.  Protect yourself legally.  Be prepared for a long-term investment.

Be prepared to run a marathon when it comes to promoting your product.


And with that sage advice kids, we’ll wrap it up!

We want to thank Lance for taking time out of his busy schedule to touch base with us and give the world a look behind the curtains at Warehouse 9.

If you’d like to learn more about Warehouse 9 Productions Ltd, connect with them or get in touch with Lance and his team, you’ll find great links below.

That’s all for now, go make some Comics!


Connect with Lance and Warehouse 9 Productions:

www.warehouse9pro.com

twitter/@Warehouse9Ltd

https://vimeo.com/user2463860